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tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about th
is a senior fellow at our global economy, and i will sit with him and asking a few questions. and then we will turn to questions over to you, the audience. we will have simultaneous translation. my mother, may she rest in piece, is a greek language teacher. she will be rolling in a great asset to my own good piece on. so without i give you alexis tsipras. [applause] >> please join your piece to number two for the translation. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i want to express our opinions, our view on the cause of the crisis, and our vision for the necessary changes that have to take place in greece. so that we can change from becoming guinea pigs of the crisis to the country that will serve as the starting point for new, progressive changes that will lead the worldwide economy to safe harbors. and so it is a special honor for me to be here at brookings. this is a foundation with strong traditions and document conversation with facts. this is a foundation that and cn understand what's at stake, both in greece and in europe today. when i was young i remember those older than me t
as we near the 1500 mark on the s&p 500. and a 0.1% contraction is expected for the german economy in the fourth quarter. those figures will be out in just under 30 minutes. >>> the governors of the banks of italy -- trade in siena. and imf's christine legarde tells us that central bank stimulus is still needed. >> we have the central bank on the one hand which have done quite a lot, which have been the fireman, in a way. and you have the policymakers on the other hand particularly in the eurozone who have made some progress and need to keep the momentum. >> now, any minute now, we're expecting the results from germany's ifo institute. january business climate index survey is expected to rise to a reading of 103 from 102.4 in december. this, of course, follows an increase in expectations in the dew survey earlier this week. we've seen an increase in the pmi surveys for germany over the last couple of months. as the german economy particularly looking to climb out of its contraction in the fourth quarter, we're waiting on the ifo senior va to tell us whether sentiment broadly speaki
great economies, france and germany. they have been friends for 50 years. >> after centuries of conflict, they culminated in two world wars. speaking at a news conference in berlin, german chancellor angela merkel and french president francois hollande talking about that. >> they promised to unveil proposals in the coming months and it is a big step forward dr. became to power pledging to reverse the plans that merkel had championed. >> it is the first time these bundestag has had a full parliament from another country here. the french president, hollande, recalled the original spirit leading to the historic relationship. >> young people are not only our future but also the reason for the policies that we are pursuing. >> young people in both of our countries have the uncomfortable good fortune that they have never had to experience in it. but peace and democracy. >> he also addressed the economic crisis in europe and chancellor merkel followed suit. she stressed it is necessary. >> what have we learned from 50 years of franco-german friendship? our greatest problems can be solved when w
economy. obviously, the u.s. economy is still a global leader. we wanted to remain that way. the political debated home has been very much about jobs and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders from the eu and the other sort of entities that are here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all of this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> we have a natural gas boom and we have an oil boom and we have, thanks to low interest rates, what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much more can happen and, in fact, it seems like the only body, the only institution that might stand in the way of 2013 being a great year is congress. >> well, listen, there is certainly not the outcome that anybody wants. and i'm hoping that after we've been through the election and last november. we've been through a fiscal cliff debate. we are working our way through a debt ceiling debate. i think in a responsible manner. with an e
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
actually a friend of the system and the economy. take a listen to this one. >> i think jpmorgan was a -- was not just a fair weather friend. we were there in good times and bad times for everybody, including nations. for spain and italy we will tell you -- we were lending $15 billion net of collateral. net derivatives, spain and italy. yes, it's governments and multi- nationals if you want to be transparent. what would you do? what would you all do? if you were my board of directors, it's easy to say don't take the risk. move out. we've been in spain and italy, one for 60 years, wur finish over 100 -- one for over 100. we're not a fair weather friend. companies want us there. we have to manage that risk. something may go wrong. >> got to tell you guys, the feedback after that panel was actually not good. a lot of people criticizing jamie just in the hallways. obviously a lot of people happy to see him defending the bank. a lot of bankers here. the mood, nature of where we are. there was some criticism. the other big news, by the way, not happening in davos -- yeah? >> i was goin
about what's happening with the domestic economy. >> yeah. rates probably close to 50% in europe. europe obviously is a collection of smaller companies. if you're historically in those countries you've had to reach out much sooner than american companies have. they're global leaders in their industry around the world. they just happen to be based here in europe and one of our key messages of the last four years has been buy european countries and make sure they have as little exposure as possible. that's generally the message. there's more competition in the market now even from peripheral countries benefiting in the risk rally. >> i wonder about philips, too, reporting tomorrow. are they seen similar to alcoa as the barometer? >> i think, you know, any big company which comes out and meaningfully beats or disappoints the market, european equities are up .25% from the lows in the summer. it could be any number of big stocks which sets the near term direction of the market. overall, it's very unlikely. the corporate sector has within its power to greatly disappoint or please the markets a
.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news for the spanish economy. >>> now in a long-anticipated speech on the future of britain in the european union, prime minister cameron has warned that democratic consent from a u.k. membership is "wafer thin." speaking in london, he said he's in favor of having e.u. referendum but not at the moment and urged e.u. leaders to address the challenges currently alienating the electorate. >> there's a gap between the e.u. and citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years and which represents a lack of democratic accountability and consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. now if we don't address these challenges, the sdarj that europe will -- danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >> i spoke to unilever's paul pohlman to get his thoughts on the strained relationship with the european union and whether a potential u.k. exit is bad for business. >> if you create a certain level of uncertainty between now and 2017 or whatever the date is of a proposed referendum i
economy, which is completely manageable. this has shot up dramatically and it's going to continue to shoot up under current policies. the evidence is very clear in academic literature. it's very clear in international observation. there comes a point where your debt in terms of your economy reaches leve a level in which ct markets become noticeably disturbed and you become very worried. and if it's -- rising interest rates which then spread throughout the economy. mortgage rates and consumer rights and so forth. this is a certainty, and it is the path we are on that will have extreme consequences that we are not used to think about in this country spend i asked the question how much time do we really have. you know, with the u.s. per person debt now 35% higher at. wendy think we face our greek moment -- when do you think we take our greek moment to get our fiscal house in order? >> right now we are having good news-bad news situation. the good news is that despite all that we have done wrong, we're still one of the safest places in the world to invest. there's a lot of places around the wo
a greater growth in the u.s. economy i think is still a question mark. >> down europe, up 10% china. okay. china, can be a source of top line growth. latin america could be a source of top line growth. >> and when asked about china, the words for sure, the idea that china is staging a rebound. >> and this is despite the fact that they have terrible fraud there. kind of overlooked it. when you're in that virtuous circle, it doesn't seem to matter what you say that's negative. people want to grasp the positive. it's a different kind of market from what we've had for multiple years. >> and to melissa's point about correlation, it's not that risk on, risk off, which we have dealt with for so long now. every hedge fund would come in, and say, europe's bad today, risk off. >> there are no more excuses for the fund managers who are underperforming the s&p 500. this year could be a good year, a different kind of year from the hedge funds that have done so poorly. >> they're going to have to do actual work. >> right. they will have to show performance now. >> they'll have to go through these quart
in 2014. the moves do follow heavy pressure from shinzo abe despite reflation and a flagging economy. but the yen actually settled higher with some economists. look at that. that is suggesting they ended up almost 1.2% above the dollar. there's questions whether the 2% dollar stated can be achieved. now there's plenty more on the boj's inflation packed with the government live. hi. >> hi, kelly. the bank of japan and the government issued a joint statement that set a 2% inflation target today replacing its current 1% price. from japan's monetary policy has shifted into unexplored territory. the boj agreed to try and hit the 2% target as quickly as possible rather than over the medium to long-term. but the target will probably be difficult to meet. forecasts released by the bank showed that the consumer price index will rise to just 0.9% in the fiscal year starting in 2014. boj officials said that the 2% target will be possible if the country's growth potential is improved by further government reform. the joint statement is binding for both the government and the boj calling on both
your sense of what's going on in terms of the global economy. how do you see things? >> sure. why don't we start in europe. europe remains a challenging place. i think that the actions that mr. draghi took have technically been very strong. i think they have put a safety net under the market, but i think the challenge, is and it's one of the big topics here, is how do we get growth back into these economies. fundamentally that's what we need to do, and i don't think there's a clear path to that but it will take some time. >> been a tough couple of years. >> yes, it has. >> let's talk about citi, you're repositioning the firm. how are you planning on doing that and what's the vision going forward? >> our strategy, maria, is really focused around a few of the big secular things going on in the world. globalization, urbanization and digitization. if you think of globalization, thinking of what's going on in the economy, most of the growth is coming from the developing countries. you look at 2008 to 2012, 45% of world growth came from china. a trend we're going to continue to see the next
of an economy. steams you come there and you obviously things don't always always come through. northbound suggested it's because the adjectives are fun. do you buy that? >> no. i would say the last couple of years, people were pretty negative. i have to say, though i've only been here a day, people are pretty positive this time. a bit more optimistic about what might be happening. i wouldn't say it's time to pop champagne, but people have been more positive this year. >> thank you for being here. joe, becky, back to you guys. we'll see new a little bit. we have a fun segment for you at 6:30. >> you do. i looked through some of the stuff, andrew. you're a regular skier. >> it's a little embarrassing, but we'll show it to you. >> don't give it away. >> but your heel -- >> there it is. >> your heel is not tethers to the ski, right? that's what makes it -- right? >> this is a different type of skiing that i had never done before. >> oh, god. good. >> now you've got the piece. you'll see it. there might be a fall or two involved. >> that's how your hair got messed up yesterday. >>> coming, wha
of the ongoing drought is having on the u.s. economy and food prices. plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> one of the key themes, of course, for any exhibition on the civil wars are the abolition and e mans nation. we are fortunate that they came of age what they did. between the two of them, they make issues around e mans passion and abolition. issues around human rights and american freedom on a general nonrace specific level. ly go through every piece of include that johnson puts in the picture. i'll summarize by saying for you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half. what you get is a white cat in the bedroom window and dark skin black woman holding a child. there's a ladder and a fabric coming out the other. there's a way in and out without being seen. there's a rooster up here. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and calling to the hen to spend the night with them. the hen is on top of the slave quarters. if you add up of the little ins and outs and look down here at the white girl enteri
's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking with the palace. today is a day for israelis to make a choice about their next leaders. no political party has ever gained a majority in israeli elections. so there's expected to be a lot of postturing about what type of government there will be for israel over the next four years. my colleague looks at what is on the ballot box today. >> israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu was cheery this morning as he arrives to vote. by the end of the day he will likely have something more to be chief about. the leader of the party is expected to come out on top and keep his job. but at jerusalem's main market the lack of suspense means there's little fever. they talk about israel being divided and disillusioned. most take it as a give than benjamin netanyahu will remain in office. >> if you ask me, nothing. no b.b., no nothing. >
areas of agreement between myself, i am a conservative, and don. we both agreed that this economy will do well because of energy. we both believe it is on the upswing because of housing. >> that is all you have to say? stuart: we also agree on taxes. >> we should have a free enterprise, free market system. stuart: why are you such a supporter of the most leftist president in american history? >> it is not just a chief financial officer, it is a leader of our nation. he has no peers when it comes to any other candidate on the republican side or any other republican sitting in the senate. we are out of time. connell: good morning, everyone. i am connell mcshane. dagen: i am dagen mcdowell. things are looking up on the jobs front. connell: monica crowley. dagen: dreamliner, the troubles have not gone away for boeing. michael dell has ordered one of them. connell: then there is jamie dimon and john chambers. you will be hearing from both of them in this hour. liz claman at the world economic forum. cheryl: stocks now and every 15 minutes. apple. nicole: i will show you apple in a mome
the budget, how to grow the economy. that's the kind of debate the country desevens. by the way, if we keep going down this path, we will have a debt crisis. it's not an if question, it's a when question. >> i remember him, alternativest young congressman from wisconsin that used to come on "squawk box." >> still fighting budget balthsds. >> if he's going to go on somewhere, at least he went on with david. congress must pass a stopgap spending bill by march 27th to keep the u.s. government running. and don't do that with your sneezes. >> what was that? i held it in. >> that's like -- >> i've been trying to hold it in because you were talking. >> no, no, it's going to come out. that's bad for you. something inside is going to pop or something. like an anneurism. it's bad to be repressed like that. let it out. >> that's his whole life. >> oh. >> let it out. >> michelle caruso ka brar ray. you're like a guest on the show, but thank you for being kind. >> it's the greatest feeling in the world. let it out. >> yeah, others have -- anyway, more trouble in egypt, a state of emergency has been decl
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
they were so-called developed economies. and so what i thought i would do here is just run through some of the lessons that we learned there that i think, unfortunately, shut up and looked at by the europeans. and they are only now starting to realize that they could have cut down the present negative situation because let's face it, europe as a whole, with a few exceptions, is in either a recession or stagnation. first, each country is unique. this is something they didn't want to see. greece adding the situation by longtime mismanagement on the fiscal side and raid the banks. in the case of ireland, it was the banks the drag the sovereign is -- sovereign as. in the case of portugal, with some portuguese in the audience here, it was basically a decade of no growth in portugal. in the case of spain, it was a bubble in real estate that was financed by mainly the savings and loan institutions, some of which have gone under, a number have gone under. and a government that basically drove up the deficit, and regional governments because regions are very important in spain, also drove up thi
in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, what is the outlook? >> to me, what i've been saying for a few months is that europe's past is bounded from below and from above. we've ruled out the worst of the crisis, thank god. but the austerity, unemployment and continued downward wage pressures put a tight ceiling on growth. so germany is growing less than 11%
low, but a guest said, look, washington is going to mess up the economy. the sequestering issue is prevalent, and the debt ceiling debate is going to further erode consumer confidence, people will not spend, and the rally might be in jeopardy. i'm a real basking of hopefulness and positivity. >> thank you so much. the unions, lou dobbs weighs in on dwindling union membership, but to the point, there's a rally holding on, but a rally nonetheless. >> that's right. the s&p right now, which was above 1500, 1502 to be exact a short time ago, back to the levels we saw in 2007. we're trying to hang on to the rally, but thinking the dow was up more than a hundred points, and now it's up 3 dlsh 4 -- 41. >> will the markets hold on despite with what's going on with apple breaking down? clinging to green, approached the 1500 level not seen in years. if we end higher, that's the 7th consecutive day of gains, the longest winning streak in more than six years for the s&p. >> and no longer the apple of wall street's eye. it pummeledded as they posted the fourth most profitable company ever. >>
and the germans do it, they do it right. and weak economies, heavily dependent on exports, heavily dependent on the car industry and that could go up and down. two things. i don't think they have the political will to engage outside the borders and i don't think they have the financial resources to do as much as we thought they should do and even some of their policy people think they should do relative to their national security, strength, military strength. is always not in a condition to do that and a heavy reliance on u.s. presence as that diminishes, some tough decisions to make as other nations. >> good morning. barbara matthews, international regulatory analytics. i have a question about the 20% written large. you have described what sounds like what you consider to be an inevitable retrenchment if not potential return to some isolation in the united states weather for political reasons or budgetary constraint purposes. that is a different position than the guarantor of security and liberty globally. europe may not have the financial resources to pick up the baton. can you describe wh
from our economy, particularly for hispanics and african-americans. >> dana, the stock market is at a five-time high -- a five-year high. unemployment is at a five-year low. he says on the one hand he wants to reach out. you can see the shares in the dow jones right now. what is this man talking about? please, translate it because i'm not intelligent enough to understand it. >> there is apparently a bit of a mixed message occurring at the rnc winter meeting. >> in the very brain of the chairman. >> i think bobby jindal had a point where he said we need to stop being the party of austerity. we need to stop saying how good we can be at shrinking and cutting government. that is not a winning message. he's absolutely right about that. and then you have the party here in washington doing exactly what he said not to do, and you have paul ryan coming forward and saying, yes, i'm going to -- we lost the election so i'm actually going to double down on this. i'm going to cut 40% of the federal government out over the next ten years because that's exactly what the people want to hear an
in the u.s., in germany and to an extent in the uk. >> the trouble is for all of those economies maybe some of the european ones are under pressure by the government. but the problem is, if you look at issues in the u.s., they're just so low. there's no ability to cut in the long-term. how do you push through entitlement reform and address those issues, especially if there's no market pressure right now? >> my sense is that you don't. i don't understand how that can be achieved and, therefore, i suppose what i struggle with is what solution can the government find? the bank of japan, if you monetize the debt in a low inflationary environment, is this a free lunch? >> right. >> in the uk, it has turned out to be a free lunch. would it in japan? possibly, yes, and, therefore, i wonder if these issues ever will be addressed. >> and what's so interesting, you're seeing these bizarre rates happening in a monetary policy. we feel like we're in a whole new regime where people feel like it doesn't matter at all. wondering if it matters at all how much you spend and borrow in these situations. how d
in the red for 2012. the world's third biggest economy has posted a trade deficit of $78.3 billion. u.s. house ever presented this has passed a bill to extend the debt limit until may. it effectively put off the possibility of the u.s. defaulted on its debt. three weeks earlier, congress and the white house hammered out the last-minute deal to prevent the so-called fiscal cliff. the u.s. debt stands at $16.50 trillion. the british prime minister has been building on wednesday's historic speech about his country's future with the european union. david carolwood speaking at the world economic forum -- david cameron was speaking at the world economic forum in switzerland. >> britain has a choice purdue and hope it stands back and the argument -- britain has a choice. they can stand back or say yes, the european union needs to change to suit the euro but also to suit all of us as well. make the argument for a flexible, competitive euro, take the british people with you. >> south africa is looking at newark power for its future nuclear ended -- at nuclear power for its future and nuclear e
community reacted in a very still a way to the threat of but leaving, saying that the german economy would be able to cope with that, though it would of course regret it. even more important, perhaps, the united states reacted very negatively. the relationship between britain and the united states has been the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting disease are also priorities. he's expected to easily win approval for the job from the senate. to syria where authorities have called for a million-man prayer at mosques on friday in an effort to stem anti-regime demonstrations. >> the embattled president was also shown on state television praying with syr
descending on the tiny ski town off davos, switzerland for the world economic forum. the economy will be front and center as the group's founder has warned the world has not yet escaped the risk of economic collapse? do we ever. we have davos covered all week long. you will not want to miss a minute with liz claman. she sits down with richard gelfond, imac ceo. that is right here on fox business. she has a slew of guests. all the all-stars. lori: want to take a trip to a warmer climate? southwest airlines announcing well, it might cost you a little more especially if you want to board early. a $40 fee guaranties passengers get to be one of the first 15 people in line to board. travelers who want to be first on the plane can purchase the option at the gate up to 45 minutes before boarding. but space is limited. only 15 of these early passes will be sold. southwest, the nation's most popular domestic airline already charges $10 for early bird check-in service but early bird service improves your spot in the boarding queue. doesn't guaranty a specific spot like the fee will and grab
, of the global economy and also for us in europe, um, is free trade. we have, unfortunately, a lot of protectionist tendencies in the world today. when we met at the g20 meeting outlined this time and again and impressed this on us, and we need to do everything we can in order to contain these protectionist tendencies. the doha round, the world trade organization has not, unfortunately, developed in such a positive direction as we wished. so in the future, too, unfortunately, we need to pin our hopes on financial trade agreements. and germany, i can promise you, will be very proactive as regards the conclusion of such fha agreements. we've now given the mandate for a free trade agreement with japan, with canada. we're shortly before conclusion of an fta with the -- [inaudible] states. we urgently need to come to such agreements. and after decades of failed attempts, we would like to do this with the united states as well, develop such a free trade agreement with the european union. quite often cultural exports are a bit bit of a hurdle here on bh sides, but i think we need to do, w
the lights out. they do favor general motors. i'm saying that the rails as an indicator of the economy, may be failing, because they are so coal-based. but union pacific reports tomorrow that is less coal-based and i think they blow it out. union pacific is a winner. >> interesting point. we'll get a lot more after the break. stick around. we'll see how mcdonald's opens for trading now that we've got their earnings comps. >>> speaking of restaurants, we'll talk to ron shaich about the state of his business and what's new at the chain. [ maleu turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. whatever your business challenge, i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares fo
by superstorm sandy. >> dupont 2013, a cautious year with the slow growth world economy. how worrisome are those comments from the economic bellwether. >> j & j exceeds estimates. the full year forecast a bit below the streets, as investors pay close attention to new ceo alex gorsky. >>> the dow component reporting fourth quarter numbers of 38 cents. that was well below estimates. verizon said the results were impacted by superstorm sandy. we're just getting details now, david, on activations on things like the iphone, 6.2 million, not too shabby. >> the problem was not necessarily activations, carl. the key is simply that margins came in even worse than had been anticipated. this, after the company already guided them down a bit at the consumer electronics show a couple of weeks back. and there, of course, you're talking about operating koose i higher than anticipated. investors may be a little concerned today when you take a look at that chart there. now, listen, to carl's point, they're adding a lot of customers. they're activating a lot of devices. we talk often about the subsidy for the app
greece trying to revive an economy on life support. >> new year for spain. but is there is little for the lively european country to celebrate. unemployment is over 26%, the worst since the '70s. joblessness among young people is over 55%. spaniards, under 25, have little hope. >> it's 2012 was a bad year, you can imagine the prospects that spaniards have. nothing. at the end, we all have to leave, just like our parents did to immigrate. >> strange recession worsened too. economic growth down last year. budget cuts and tax hikes to avoid a full-scale bail-out accord og the efforts are hurting short-term recovery. with backing from the european central bank might offer long-term hope. bond sales to write down spain's debt went well. >> we are getting indicators that it's slowly adjusting. start to turn in the coming quarter. >> greece might be building on a couple of years of austerit austerity. the country is qualifying for e.u. bail-out money. 2013 is bringing more protests. young and old in athens. unemployment in greece is higher than spain. and pensions are slinking. >> we are
're concerned about their economy, but iran is definitely up there front and center, and the meeting between the u.n. nuclear watch dog and iran has been pushed back by a day. it will be on february 13th, perhaps another stall tactic. will netanyahu become more aggressive toward iran and could we expect to see more unilateral decisions with respect to iran? >> i believe prime minister netanyahu is dedicated and committed to stopping iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. and time indeed is running out. we believe that by the summer it may be too late. so what we're looking at is actually the spring, maybe, june at the latest, when a decision will have to be made. we still hope that the diplomacy will play its role. we still hope that sanctions will work. but if they don't, i believe that prime minister netanyahu will make sure and will keep his word that he will not allow iran to become nuclear. he will not be willing to be the prime minister during the second holocaust of israel. he is very committed to that. but in order to do that he would need a very strong coalition, very, very strong re
of things have a negative impact on the economy. the senate that we can beat this debt the better it's going to be for everybody. gerri: last word. tell me, are drones enough to take care of this problem? >> the bottom line, but we have to learn is that we cannot afford billiard. terrorists love a vacuum, and wherever it develops kamal to leave, to pose a threat to the united states. next year it could be afghanistan. we have to be on guard. gerri: thank you for coming on. great job. you guys really explained it all. thank you. >> thanks. gerri: if you're fired up about this or any of the issues, a drop me an e-mail. >> coming up on "the willis report," unemployment is higher. could it be because he has gone awful year without meeting with his jobs council? we tackle this and more house republicans finally unveil their new debt ceiling deal. we examine the good combat command ugly with americans for tax reform president gror norquist later. one ohio teacher said she has a crippling fear of being children, but is still being forced to work with them. she says it is discrimination. we have to
're mixing up at 16.4 trillion. all yours. martha: hopeful. it is about the economy that is bad here in the united states. we'll tell you where unemployment just hit 26%. you don't wan to be there, folks. >>> plus kapernicking? that is what he is doing, the 49ers quarterback. that little craze right now sweeping the nation. why it is now a legal term? bill: hot dog. dit card rewards are easy to remember with the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas. no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy the most. [ woman ] it's as easy as... one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. martha: kapernicking. bill: first tebowing. now capper nicking. super bowl bound quarterback out of san francisco, colin cab per nick. the guy is a stud -- kapernick. he lifts the arm and kisses the old bicep. he wants to trademark that move. one website selling the official kapernicking t-shirt. his adopti
economy gave us an actual surplus of funding. sense that there is at the white house a feeling, two things that i would like to disabuse the white house of. thfirst is tt the budget problem isn't a real problem. i can't believe that people at the white house think that. i mean, everybody knows it is. senator mcconnell gave a very good explanation of what was going -- what was going on there, but let me say it this way -- in 2025, according to the congressional budget office, every dollar of taxes we collect will go to pay for medicare, medicaid, social security and interest on the debt, and there is nothing left for national defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program w
are booming and our place in the world economy has never been stronger. our ties with the people's republic of china in particular are deep -- from the chinese immigrants crossing the pacific in 1848 to hosting china's next president in los angeles last february. this year we will take another step to strengthen the ties between the world's second and ninth largest economies. in april, i will lead a trade and investment mission to china with help from the bay area council and officially open california's new trade and investment office in shanghai. water central to the life of our state is water and one sixth of that water flows through the san joaquin delta. silicon valley, the livermore valley, farmers on the east side of the san joaquin valley between fresno and kern county and farmers on the west side between tracy and los banos, urban southern california and northern contra costa, all are critically dependent on the delta for water. if because of an earthquake, a hundred year storm or sea level rise, the delta fails, the disaster would be comparable to hurricane katrina or superstorm s
more political freedom, human rights, better economy, jobs. remarkably hosni mubarak was ousted, victor, two years later many of these people behind us and throughout egypt not happy. they're protesting the current government now and the current president, muhammad morsi. >> we have seen the protests over the two years, especially when muhammad morsi made the power grab as many would call it at the end of 2012. what are these protesters demanding today? >> reporter: well, these are the secularists, the moderates, the liberals who feel they have been squeezed out of the political process. they're concerned about their rights moving forward. we spoke to one of the protesters. here's what she had to say. >> everybody's protesting. what did we get since two years? we got nothing. nothing achieved. >> reporter: the president says be patient. this is part of the process. >> we need a sign, a small thing. >> reporter: you don't think he's given you a sign? >> look at the constitution. look at the constitution. is this a constitution for all egyptians? >> reporter: he says people voted on it. >
. we want to see tax reform to expand the economy and go further. this is a succession. that will go into effect. then you have a cr that will go at the end of the month. that is another movement and an opportunity. >> gretchen: all right. congressman kevin mccarthy, nominate you for football coach potentially with your standing ovation. thanks for your time today. >> thanks for having me. >> gretchen: one of the most insane videos you're going to see all day long. (scream) >> gretchen: plane nearly taking out that biker. you might ask yourself what is the biker doing on the tarmac? the whole thing caught on camera. luke perry is back on the rodeo. can he deliver classic lines like this? stick around. >> seeing this world and there is two kinds of people, my friend. those are load guns and those who ♪ just one bite opens a world of delight... ♪ ♪ a flavor paradise of delicious fishes ♪ ♪ friskies seafood sensations. ♪ feed the senses. it'but sleep train's huge foryeais ending soon.models for a short time, save hundreds on tempur-pedic mattresses. get the most highly-recom
than an hour. he says the economy is rebounding and is expected to lay out an ambitious and optimistic agenda. well carry the speech live on abc7 and stream it live on starting at 9:00. right now, mike has the forecast. >> the system to the south of live doppler 7 hd is starting to unwind. that mean we will have clouds and upper 30's to low 60's before the next chan of storms later this afternoon. after that, we get a break tomorrow. sue? >> heavy traffic. we have an early accident off on the shoulder but it is slow moving past lucas valley road and north 221, 25 minutes late and martinez is ten minutes late and there are ♪ i'm a survivor [ cheers and applause ] >>> all the people braving the cold out in times square this morning. a lot of hats, a lot of scarves, a lot of gloves and a lot of smiles out in times square. robin and josh is off. sam on assignment. great to have amy robach and bill weir from "nightline." there's sam down in discovery cove in seaworld. you're hearing "survivor" from by destiny's child. we're going to talk live to michelle williams, about the w
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